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Graduate Electives

This directory provides a comprehensive listing of all of the courses offered by Tufts Gordon Institute that are open as elective courses to graduate students across Tufts University. If you're not currently enrolled at Tufts but would like to take a standalone course, please visit our Individual Courses page to learn more.

To ensure our students' safety and wellbeing during the global pandemic, some on-campus courses have been converted to online or hybrid learning experiences. Please reference Tufts University's Student Information System (SIS) to confirm course locations.

EM 153: Management of Innovation (3 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course will cover:

  • Knowledge and skill development for students who aspire to lead and manage innovation initiatives in technology-based companies.
  • Technology strategy and its role in the overall business strategy of commercial firms.
  • Role of innovation in entrepreneurial ventures and established firms.
  • Skills to present new product development proposals to senior management and/or prospective investors.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

Note: This course is required for the Engineering Management minor.

EM 193: Special Topics in Engineering Management (3 credits)

When: Some Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course varies in topic each time that it is offered throughout the academic year. Full description and details can be found on SIS during the time of registration.

ENT 101: Entrepreneurship and Business Planning (3 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

There is no better way to understand how to create, plan and run a business than to learn how to start one. In this course, we will introduce the core mindset and skillset behind new venture creation. Students will learn how to systematically explore their own passions and desire for impact to find problems worth solving, team up with other students with similar industry or sector interests, and learn how to build a new, standalone venture by building and pitching one in the course of the semester. Students will learn tools and frameworks from practicing entrepreneurs. The mindset and skillset you will learn will form a strong foundation for you to further explore additional topics in innovation, entrepreneurship, and leadership.

Upon completion of the course, students will have learned to speak the language of business. Specifically, they will:

  • Learn to be nimble, agile, iterative and how to “fail fast”
  • Understand the basic principles behind innovation and new venture creation, including but not limited to:
    • Exploring their own sense of purpose, and finding problems that are important and worth solving, with the potential for significant impact
    • Analyzing market opportunities and selecting a target market segment
    • Understanding your market and customer
    • Building a solution that is different and better than the alternative
    • Developing a go-to-market strategy and business model
    • Building a marketing plan to raise awareness & generate leads
    • Learning how to make money and build a financially sustainable venture
    • Understanding what it takes to build and contribute to a high performing team, and the logistics around building a company
    • Effective presentation skills

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

Note: This course is required for the Entrepreneurship minor.

ENT 103: Entrepreneurial Finance (3 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course focuses on developing and applying the financial skills that are needed to successfully manage commercial and social enterprises. Students will learn how to construct a financial business plan for a startup, analyze and contrast the financial statements of existing companies, and evaluate business opportunities to optimize financial outcomes and avoid financial peril. Students will also learn about the different forms of company financing and how professional investors and lenders evaluate companies. By the end of the course, students will understand how to financially position a company to maximize its potential of raising appropriate capital. The course is taught through a variety of readings, problem sets, case studies, and team exercises. It is hands-on.

This course has a rigorous workload. This includes the numerous problem sets and Harvard Business School cases previously mentioned, as well as a capstone term project where each student will create a fully vetted financial plan for a startup or existing company. After taking the course students will gain a mastery of how to:

  1. analyze the financial statements of a company
  2. build pro forma financial statements for new product (or service) initiatives, department budgets within a company, or a simple business
  3. quantify and apply core financial return concepts such as net present value, internal rate of return, multiple on investment, payback, ROI, leveraged versus unleveraged return, dilution, and break-even analysis to vital business applications
  4. apply the financial principles to evaluate a new product or business idea, and its impact on the financial health and performance of the business
  5. complete a simple valuation of a business and construct its enterprise value, market value of equity, post-money value, and pre-money value

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing. Prerequisite: ENT 101

Note: 

  • This course is required for the Entrepreneurship minor.
  • It's recommended that students complete at least one core ENT class or accounting elective prior to this course.
ENT 105: Entrepreneurial Marketing (3 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course focuses on institutional and product marketing methods used by start-up to medium-sized companies. After an overview of basic marketing principles, the course will cover the spectrum from day-to-day marketing activities of the entrepreneurial business to positioning and strategy. Students will learn to analyze, formulate, and implement marketing strategies, explore concepts for understanding customer behavior and creating an entrepreneurial marketing strategy, and learn the fundamentals of market research, pricing, and reaching and selling to customers.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing. Prerequisite: ENT 101

Note: This course is required for the Entrepreneurship minor.

ENT 107: Entrepreneurial Leadership (3 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course is designed to help students develop the knowledge, confidence, skills, and self-image necessary to pursue entrepreneurial ventures in such domains as business, government, and public service. It provides a foundation in the fundamentals of entrepreneurial leadership, as well as a source of inspiration and energy in the art and science of taking visions and bringing them to reality.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing. Prerequisite: ENT 101

Note: This course is required for the Entrepreneurship minor.

ENT 109: Societal Aspects of Design (3 credits)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description: 

The multi-disciplinary perspective of innovative, technology-based design process for societal and community influence. Elements and principles of design from the product development process, thought and emotion, ethics, and responsibility. Experiments to explore failure and iteration, reflection for self-discovery and innovation. Articulation and expression via written, oral, and pre-recorded audio and video presentations showing the measurable impact of solutions as societal benefits.

Note: This is an elective for SMFA, A&S, and SOE as ENT109 or EE193-4. Cross-listed as EE193.4.

ENT 141: Innovative Social Enterprises (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

Innovative Social Enterprises is structured to provide students a highly interactive exploration of core skills vital to social entrepreneurs.  Whether students aim to found social enterprises, join social enterprises, or possibly fund, regulate, or incubate social enterprises, they will come away with sharpened self-awareness and practices for innovative leadership in the social enterprise sphere.  We start with awareness (self, context, relationships) and move quickly to practicing requisite disciplines (asking questions; testing and reframing assumptions; forming teams and other alliances; identifying opportunities, risks, and resources; giving and critiquing pitches; making go / no-go decisions).  We will practice an iterative rhythm of weekly information gathering, sensing, assessment, and reframing, with emphasis on creating compelling value for multiple stakeholders.  Students will engage in individual reflection and pitching, as well as group discussion and three team pitch-offs. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

Notes: Taught in Partnership with Tisch College; Cross-listed as AMER 141, TCS 141

ENT 151: Entrepreneurship for Computer Scientists (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This is an introductory entrepreneurship course for Computer Science students. The course provides an overview of entrepreneurship, develops an entrepreneurial perspective, and provides a framework for learning the fundamentals of the essential elements of entrepreneurial ventures. This course is specifically directed toward software-related industries and products. Students learn how to develop their technical ideas into potential business opportunities, and to explore their likelihood of becoming viable businesses. They learn how to do market research, to develop go-to-market strategies, value propositions, and to differentiate their products or services from actual or potential competitors. The course consists of a balance of lectures, projects, case studies, and interaction with entrepreneurs and computer scientists who participate in entrepreneurial organizations. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing. This course requires department consent (Computer Science major or minor). and a background in Data Science or Computer Science.

Notes: Taught in partnership with Tufts Department of Computer Science; Cross-listed as COMP 150

ENT 162: Bringing Products to Market (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course covers the design process of a consumer product from ideation to the pre-production of a new product. The course teaches the consumer-centered design process through lectures and the creation, engineering, and prototyping of a novel product. Students learn to identify and evaluate a problem (opportunity), create, develop, test (with consumers), and select the best prototyping strategies for their product. Basic project and risk management, engineering, and analysis skills are used to deliver a robust working product on time and on budget. Students are assumed to be competent in basic problem-solving skills.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

ENT 193.01: Entrepreneurial Business Law (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

Entrepreneurial Business Law is an interactive class featuring speakers from the private equity, venture capital, and investment banking worlds as well as executives who have exited through a public offering or sale of their company.  We will explore legal issues and considerations that are common to businesses as they are formed and throughout their business life cycle. The course will focus on several aspects relating to formation and seed and venture capital financing, mergers and acquisitions, initial public offerings and securities laws considerations, as well as employment and intellectual property matters and governance considerations. There will also be opportunities to negotiate various financing and other transactions.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

ENT 194.01: Special Topics: Internships (3 credits)

When: Various Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

The Entrepreneurial Internship allows students to earn credit while working as an intern for their company sponsor during the semester. Under the guidance of a faculty member serving as an entrepreneurial advisor, students have a chance to apply concepts learned in the classroom and acquire new skills as they address real-life challenges.

In this course, the student assumes an employee role in the company. Internships typically involve students serving in a functional role with an entrepreneurial focus, such as product management, entrepreneurial marketing, and sales.

This internship will be graded according to the rubric outlined in the syllabus.

Click here to see the syllabus for details on requirements and the enrollment process.

ENT 194.02: Special Topics: Consumer Product Ventures (3 credits)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course covers the entrepreneurial process from conception to birth of a new venture focused on a consumer product. It looks at both process and people involved in assessing ideas, exploiting opportunities, gathering resources, and converting concepts into businesses. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which students can apply their different skill sets and abilities to enter and succeed in business. The course seeks to help students think through the career path that makes the most sense for them given their particular backgrounds and aspirations in both entrepreneurial or corporate environments.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

ENT 194.03: Special Topics: Creativity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurial Thinking (3 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This class is designed for undergraduate students, particularly Freshmen and Sophomores, who have not taken an ENT core course and are interested in learning more about innovation and entrepreneurship. Focusing on tools and techniques to promote creativity and innovation, you will develop capabilities that can be applied to everyday problem solving, launching new ventures, and working in businesses and non-profit organizations. We will engage in rapid ideation workshops where you will repeatedly challenge your brain to come up with novel solutions and innovations. You will be exposed to a variety of tools to help stimulate brainstorming and creativity. During the semester, we will study different types of innovation and use “design thinking” to address a series of real-world problems with creative solutions.

Restrictions on Enrollment:  All are welcome (especially first-year undergraduate students). We accept any undergraduate or graduate student with no significant design thinking, innovation or entrepreneurship experience to take this class.

ENT 194.04: Special Topics: Inside the Classroom (3 credits)

When: Various Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description: 

Classroom Operating Officers, known as COO’s receive course credit for providing leadership and student support for Entrepreneurship courses. By taking Inside the Classroom, you will assist in coaching peers, organizing course work, attendance tracking, and observing group work.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Registration requires department consent

Pre-requisite: Having taken the course you are proposing to support and earned an "A" grade is a prerequisite. Additionally, permission/invitation by faculty is required. Limit 2 students per ENT class.

Faculty expectations:

  • COO Selection should be made prior to the start of the semester, ideally by the end of the previous semester
  • The opportunity should be announced in class and Canvas site to encourage multiple candidates
  • The student should have successfully completed the course prior to accepting the role of COO
  • Faculty should email name and Tufts ID number for the COO’s to carol.denning@tufts.edu to provide special permission in SIS for the student to register for ENT194.04 Special Topics- Inside the Classroom
  • The selected COO’s should be added to Canvas as assistants and announced to the class with a description of the role and responsibilities
  • The COO grade should be determined by the quality of fulfillment of the COO expectations

COO Expectations:

  • COO must register for ENT194.04 Inside the Classroom at least 2 weeks prior to the start of the semester
  • COO must submit a work plan with agreed-upon objectives within 2 weeks of the start of the semester
  • COO must submit 1-page formal reflections halfway through the semester
  • COO must submit 1-page formal reflections at the end of the semester, highlighting what the COO gained from the experience along with recommendations
  • Time commitment is 6-9 hours a week, inclusive of class time
  • Assist with course prep and provide input on the syllabus
  • Act in an advisory capacity to students and respond to student inquiries in a timely manner
  • Provide guidance and motivation to students and communicate expectations on projects and assignments
  • Review papers and projects, provide feedback, lead discussions, and participate in assessments; faculty is responsible for assigning grades
  • Negotiate and resolve conflicts
  • Support faculty to create a quality learning experience for students
ENT 194.05: Special Topics: The Science of Sales (3 credits)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

Marketing isn’t Sales, and Sales isn’t Marketing, but they are both joined at the hip since every product, every service and job needs to “sold” in order to close any deal.  Our “Science of Sales” course explores process, tools, technology, metrics, and most importantly, the people that are required to actually sell, close orders, and bring in revenue.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

ENT 194.05: Special Topics: Non-Profits, Philanthropy, and Impact (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

Nonprofits are a valued engine for community engagement and innovation across the country.  They play a highly visible and essential role in meeting community needs, and they serve as laboratories for experimental, innovative strategies supporting individual opportunity and community equity objectives.  This increasingly complex sector is built on the desire to do good through scalable, sustainable organizational strategies that deliver impact. Students in this course will learn about what it takes to be a successful nonprofit: vision, resources, leadership, and execution. Through case analysis, press analysis, group discussions, and interactions with nonprofit leaders, you will learn how entrepreneurship and philanthropy are deeply intertwined in healthy, high-performing organizations. Students will also develop the skills to assess the connection between nonprofits, social change, and justice through direct conversation with grantmakers and nonprofit leaders, and will devise a grantmaking strategy and award funding to local nonprofits through a grant from former Tufts trustee Nathan Gantcher. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

Note: Taught in partnership with Tisch College

ENT 194.06: Special Topics: Team & Talent Management (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This is a course focused on the most critical success factor in creating not just young startups and emerging companies, but also any business of any size. This course, taught by a highly experienced human resource executive, focuses on the entire chain of talent management from recruiting, hiring, and onboarding new employees to the overall personnel management of the business. This course outlines the strategic planning surrounding building the organizational structure while exploring the tactics of objective setting, hiring and firing decision making, compensation structures and reviews, and employee development. This course is open to undergraduates and graduate students who are interested in bringing an innovative and entrepreneurial mindset to both startups and corporate jobs early in their careers.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

ENT 194.09: Special Topics: Strategic Management in the 21st Century (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

The course is designed for those students who aspire to directly or indirectly influence the strategic decisions of an organization through analytics-driven insights and imaginative reasoning. On the basis of a deep understanding of the emerging geo-economic, geopolitical, technological, and demographic trends, the course will examine how through intelligent use of a full range of analytical techniques including game & options theories, businesses must innovate and implement strategies in the context of a globalized economy.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have at least Sophomore standing

ENT 199: Entrepreneurial Field Study (3 credits)

When: Various Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

This immersive course enables students to apply the learning and skills acquired by other courses on Entrepreneurship to the creation and development of their own new venture. Under the guidance of a faculty member serving as an entrepreneurial advisor, students have a chance to apply concepts learned in the classroom and acquire new skills as they address real-life challenges.

In this course, the student assumes a co-founder role in the venture. The student will operate with the mindset of a business owner (responsible for overall strategy and operations for all aspects of the venture), not a functional leader (responsible for one department such as marketing, sales, engineering, or the like).

The new venture that the student is building can be for-profit, not-for-profit, or in the context of a government agency/university/association.

This field study will be graded.

Click here to see the syllabus for rubric, restrictions, and the enrollment process.

EM 201: Essentials of Technology Strategy (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course explores elements of technology strategy including portfolio management, development of product and technology roadmaps, new product development, phase gate processes, and the management of product life cycles. The focus is on disruptive, incremental, sustaining, and breakthrough innovations across multiple sectors.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: While this course is part of the Online MSEM Core Curriculum, it's currently also available for outside students via University College.

EM 202: Leadership: Personal and Team Development (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course is the first on a student’s journey to leading effective teams and organizations. It is aimed at helping students develop themselves as individual leaders by focusing on personal growth and leadership styles.  The course will utilize assessments and other tools to explore leadership styles and techniques for leading with and without authority in a variety of settings.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: While this course is part of the Online MSEM Core Curriculum, it's currently also available for outside students via University College.

EM 203: Building Financial Intelligence (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course will teach students to develop, analyze, and communicate the financial aspects of a company’s product or service. Students will learn to understand and evaluate the impact of decisions on the financial health and competitiveness of the firm.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: While this course is part of the Online MSEM Core Curriculum, it's currently also available for outside students via University College.

EM 204: Customer Discovery and Solution Design (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course is a human-centered customer discovery course focused on research, analysis, brainstorming, and ideation methods to inform product and business solutions.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: While this course is part of the Online MSEM Core Curriculum, it's currently also available for outside students via University College.

EM 206: Introduction to Data Analytics (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

Students learn to gather, analyze, and interpret data to drive strategic and operational success in technology-based companies. Develop skills to make data-based decisions with uncertain or ambiguous conditions, and develop models for decision-making in a business setting.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: While this course is part of the Online MSEM Core Curriculum, it's currently also available for outside students via University College.

EM 207: Solving Complex Problems Through Systems Thinking (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

Within this course, students will learn to:

  • Examine connected complex systems that impact technology projects while taking into account human, political, community, resource, environmental, and social processes.
  • Leverage insights from structural influences to maximize impact and solve problems in increasingly complex and high-tech environments

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: While this course is part of the Online MSEM Core Curriculum, it's currently also available for outside students via University College.

EM 208: Program and Project Management (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

In today’s unpredictable, fast-moving business environment, project management can make or break a product launch. Additionally, a program of interrelated projects can have a profound impact on the success or failure of a company. This course is a learning-in-action experience that gives you the tools, techniques, and confidence to keep large-scale programs and time-sensitive projects on track and on schedule. You also will learn how to implement agile methodologies to manage projects with complex requirements and high levels of change.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: While this course is part of the Online MSEM Core Curriculum, it's currently also available for outside students via University College.

EM 209: Leadership: Driving and Managing Change (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course teaches techniques on approaches to managing uncertainty and dealing with complex and constant change. Students will learn to manage large and diverse groups through changing internal and external force using conflict management and negotiation tools.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: While this course is part of the Online MSEM Core Curriculum, it's currently also available for outside students via University College.

EM 210A: Process Capability and Big Data - Some Selected Topics (1 credit)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 1 credit

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course introduces the “quality initiatives” (Six Sigma, TQM, Lean), and the probability and statistics fundamentals for these strategies. Students explore data types (nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio), and their relationship to distribution types (normal [Gaussian], binomial, Poisson). Techniques for estimating population statistics from sampled data, and for performing tests of hypotheses to compare samples and populations are practiced. Statistical tools and strategies are mapped to big data topics.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 210B: Design of Experiments and Predictive Models (2 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 2 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

Students gain expertise with Design of Experiments, a method for characterizing a process or system as a transfer function of its input variables, using the transfer function to obtain optimal, real-world settings for the input variables. Other approaches to transfer functions are explored, including big data approaches, regression analysis, and logistic regression. Statistical process control methods for analyzing and maintaining the behavior of systems and processes over time are explored.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 211: Lean Six Sigma (3 credits)

When: Summer, Fall, and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course provides principles and methods for process improvement by eliminating non-value added work and by reducing output variability. Tools include the define-measure-analyze-improve-control problem-solving methodology, statistical process control, statistically designed experiments and risk identification and mitigation strategies.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 212: Applied Data Science (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course provides foundational skills for data science practice in business.

Topics include:

  • Using data and systematic methods to generate business value.
  • Shaping data practices within organizations.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 213: Advanced Topics in Data Analytics (2 credits)

When: Summer, Fall, and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course builds on topics learned in EM 206 (Introduction to Data Analytics), including more complex data modeling techniques and tools. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 220C: Sustainability (1 credit)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 1 credit

Location: On-Campus

Description:

The Sustainability module introduces lifecycle thinking to product design, as well as the business case for sustainability. Students learn about sustainable product development, cradle-to-cradle lifecycle concepts, life-cycle assessments, nature-inspired design, and systems thinking. In addition, students have the opportunity to develop sustainability initiatives for their own workplace and learn how to drive sustainable thinking into product development and the corporation. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 220D: Systematic Innovations (1 credit)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 1 credit

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This module introduces students to the general principles of TRIZ-based systematic innovation. A collection of tools is applied algorithmically to identify the right problem, solve the problem efficiently, and ensure the solutions align with the business strategy. Students develop skills that can be applied to improve functionality within existing products, develop new generation products, or reduce cost. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 222: Modern Product Management (2 credits)

When: Summer, Fall, and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

Product Management is always a “tweener” role within an organization.  The exact role can span a range of responsibilities depending on the type and needs of the business, the maturity of the product or technology and the style of the management team.  Additionally, the scope, impact and focus of product management shifts dramatically thru the different growth stages of a business.  This seven class online course brings clarity to the practical impacts that a good Product Management process has to business from the earliest “ideation” stage thru building and launching the product.  This will help attendees better understand the product management role and skills, and how it changes based on various conditions of the business and its stage of growth.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 223: Advanced Topics in Product Management (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

With the rapid changes in technology, business models, and market conditions, the role and processes of product management are constantly shifting.  This course provides classes that cover some of the most pressing topics in the product process. Some areas that will be covered include Pricing, Go-to-Market acceleration, Building an Ecosystem, and Product Lifecycle management.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 224: Creativity and Innovation (2 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course lays the foundation for creativity and innovation by reminding students that deliberate creative thinking can be enhanced beyond its current state. The uniqueness of this course is that it focuses on YOU as the practitioner of creativity and innovation. We ask: What skills do YOU have now? What skills do YOU still require? What behaviors in YOU will have to change to be better at your craft?  As students, you will embrace their inner core of your own personal creativity and build on it.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 230C: Supply Chain Management (1 credit)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 1 credit

Location: On-Campus

Description:

The course focuses on the strategic impact of supply chain excellence, using case studies and simulations from high tech, retail, and large scale manufacturing to convey best practices and decision factors in supply chain management. Success in building a world-class supply chain requires functional integration both within the firm and across the network of companies, and practical application of this concept is a recurring theme in course discussion, reading, and assignments. Topics explored include: strategic supplier management, global supply chains, outsourcing decisions, inventory management, and replenishment methodologies.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 230D: Operations Management (1 credit)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 1 credit

Location: On-Campus

Description:

Students are introduced to problems and analysis related to the design, planning, control, and improvement of manufacturing and service operations. Topics include: how to map and analyze process flows, determine process capacities and bottlenecks, and design and coordinate operations within an organization. Through cases and an online simulation, students practice diagnosing and implementing process improvements.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 231: Project Management and Software Methodologies (2 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 2 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course focuses on the development of knowledge and skills to plan and execute engineering projects. Topics include creating work break down structures, schedules, critical path determination, and risk assessment and mitigation. Methodologies also include iterative techniques (agile and scrum) often used in software development. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 232: Supply Chain & Operations Management (2 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

Understanding Operations and Supply Chain Risk Management is a must for any leader in the technology field. From the shop floor to suppliers and markets on the other side of the world, any business involves a continuum with a spectrum of risks to manage. Whether you have an early-stage invention you hope to get to market, are engaged in social entrepreneurship in the U.S. or overseas, or are part of a global supply chain currently, nothing really happens until you can get your product or service from concept into the hands of customers, and understand the risks inherent in managing that supply chain. We will leverage our more than half-a-century of combined experience in global supply chain management to make you a player in building a world-class end-to-end enterprise.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 240C: Fundamentals of Economics (1 credit)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 1 credit

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course offers an overview of both macro and microeconomics and provides students with the background required for the Globalization and Multinational Strategies module. Students learn to (i) analyze current global economic issues that are related to trade balance, government budgets, unemployment, the competitiveness of innovation and manufacturing processes, (ii) assess how fiscal and monetary discipline impact economic growth and social & political stability (iii) examine how different economic philosophies shape individual and collective behaviors (iv) analyze market behaviors and (v) develop an understanding of the basics of game theory. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 240D: Globalization and Multinational Strategy (2 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 2 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

Students develop a full understanding of the forces behind globalization and the evolution of multinational companies from different regions of the world. The module examines the strategic, organizational, and operational implications of working and leading in the global environment both in a large multinational organization and in a start-up and discusses how different globalization models work across various industries. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 243: Marketing: Branding and Strategy (2 credits)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course reviews what makes brands successful and provides a deep dive into proven “Brand Building Frameworks” used by several Fortune 50 corporations.  It reinforces the learning through applying the framework to real brands.  Students will learn how to develop key elements needed to write strong brand positioning statements and pragmatic skills to market products and/or services in corporate environments.   The course will also discuss marketing experiences and competencies identified to pursue a successful marketing career in established corporations.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 244: Introduction to Management Consulting (2 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

The course, at the fundamental level, will help students:

  • (i) become familiar with the art & science of management consulting
  • (ii) develop the confidence to define & address complex strategic issues based on deep understanding of emerging trends (such as emerging geo-economic, environmental, geo-political, technological, and demographic trends), and creative problem-solving techniques 
  • (iii) learn how to influence outcomes through analytics-driven insights & imaginative reasoning and in crafting innovative communication processes

Students will learn different problem-solving frameworks and analytical techniques to make more calculated strategic choices between different business models, technologies with different risk profiles.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 252: Business Communications (3 credits)

When: Fall and Spring Terms

Credits: 3 credits

Location: Online

Description:

This course focuses on written and oral communications in the business setting. Topics include making conscious communications decisions, principles of effective written and oral communication, and different workplace audiences. Design and delivery of effective presentations. Consideration is given to the practical, philosophical, and ethical context of communication in the modern globalized business world. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 261: Leadership for Technical Professionals (3 credits)

When: Fall Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course focuses on the development of self-awareness and skills necessary for leadership, involving 360-degree assessment tools and extensive experiential learning. Topics include: oral communication, systems thinking, high-performance teams, fostering creativity, team decision making, leading change, influence without authority.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 262: Conflict Resolution (2 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 2 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course introduces conceptual frameworks, tools, and skills to effectively manage conflict and negotiate win/win solutions in the workplace.  The course will involve lectures, cases, and role-plays to simulate real on-the-job conflicts. 

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

Note: This course is also part of the MSIM Core Curriculum.

EM 293: Special Topics: Business Strategy (2 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 2 credits

Location: Online

Description:

The course is designed for those students who aspire to influence strategic decisions of an organization directly or indirectly through analytics-driven insights and imaginative reasoning. Based on a deep understanding of the emerging geo-economic, environmental, geopolitical, technological, and demographic trends, the course will examine how through intelligent use of a full range of analytical techniques including game & options theories, businesses must innovate and implement differentiated strategies. At the fundamental level, the course will help the students develop the confidence to address complex strategic issues based on creative problem-solving frameworks and practical techniques - irrespective of where they may work – large or small enterprises (process or discrete industry) in developed or developing economies to make more calculated strategic choices between different business models, technologies with different risk profiles.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 293: Special Topics: Personal Leadership (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: Online

Description:

In this course, films, novels, and short stories are used to examine the complexities and subtleties of responsible leadership. In order to succeed externally, leaders need to develop an ability to understand themselves - their energy, priorities, beliefs, core values, etc. Introspection and self-exploration will be encouraged in order to increase students’ personal effectiveness, self-awareness, and self-confidence. Students will apply all these concepts and insights into their own growth as leaders. This course also offers some intellectual tools and depth of understanding to assess various moral issues that leaders face in their personal and professional lives. Students learn what constitutes a situation with moral stakes, how such situations develop, and how leaders think through these challenges. Topics discussed include different types of moral challenges, moral leadership, professionalism, and moral reasoning.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 294: Special Topics: Managing Technology-Based Organizations in the 21st Century (1 credit)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 1 credit

Location: On-Campus

Description:

This course will address the technology policy and workforce/labor issues emerging as key drivers of success in organizations that are technology-focused in the modern era. Building on management theory and practice, legal frameworks, cultural and societal changes, and rapid technology evolution, this module will allow students to understand the multi-dimensional management challenges that are now critical elements of innovation in all industries.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 294: Special Topics: Commercializing Research (3 credits)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 3 credits

Location: On-Campus

Description:

Do you have an idea for a business or innovation that you would like to develop? Is there a social or environmental problem you would like to help solve? This course provides a dynamic and supportive atmosphere in which you will work with other students, the instructor and outside experts to examine complex problems and then develop new or existing innovations or social impact initiatives.
 
Sometimes, a world-changing innovation can evolve when an existing invention or idea is strategically introduced to meet a real need. In other cases, an invention or idea doesn’t exist at the early stages of the innovation process, but rather, is developed to meet a specific need following a deep analysis of a system and complex set of problems. Both innovation pathways are valid and require thoughtful and iterative analysis in order to develop workable and marketable solutions. An examination of these approaches is highly relevant to students interested in driving technical or social impact innovations into the world.  For example, students, and the labs they work in, often have specific innovations that show promise but their exact application, customers and pathways to markets are not clear. In other cases, students have “wicked” problems they want to solve or positive change they want to see happen, but do not yet know what to do.
 
In this course, you will become familiar with tools, skills and approaches that can help innovators map complex problems and develop strategic innovations. They apply to both for-profit and non-profit ventures and will give students the foundation and community to become lifelong innovators. Your engagement with outside speakers and panelists will give you a chance to learn from experienced innovators through an examination of their work as well as get their feedback on your designs.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree

EM 294: Special Topics: Managing Operations (1 credit)

When: Spring Term

Credits: 1 credit

Location: Online

Description:

Students are introduced to problems and analysis related to the design, planning, control, and improvement of manufacturing and service operations. Topics include: how to map and analyze process flows, determining process capacities and bottlenecks, and designing and coordinating operations in concert with the whole organization. Through cases and an online simulation, students will practice diagnosing and solving problems, and recommending and implementing process improvement actions.

Restrictions on Enrollment: Must have an undergraduate degree